Allergy from Cat

Preventing the Allergy from Cats

We find ways on how to tell if my child is allergic to cats. Cats are fluffy, furry, cuddly, and the leading cause of pet allergies in the U.S. You can be exposed to cat allergens like dander and saliva without even knowing it – like on the clothes of family and friends who own cats or from a stray roaming your yard. If you have cat allergies, the best way to help prevent symptoms is by avoiding cats. But if you visit a home with cats, take allergy medicine with you. During your visit, ask that the cat be kept away from you and when you get home, change and wash your clothes. If you have a cat, reduce your exposure at home by declaring bedrooms, furniture, and counters “pet-free” zones.

Also ask someone else to clean the litter box. All cats produce dander, so there is no such thing as a naturally hypo allergenic cat. If you have cat allergies, a pet without fur or feathers might be a better option. But before adopting any pet, consider a trial run to see how you react. Use these tips to help prevent cat allergy symptoms from striking before they even start.

Allergy testing usually involves skin prick testing which is scratches basically on the skin with various things that you could be allergic to. Most patients we start out with a prick test when you come in for an office visit and we do the allergy testing. It sits on your skin for about 12 minutes or so and then we can actually read it and tell you the results that day so that’s kind of nice to be able to come in and find out in the same day what your triggers are. Sometimes we will also use what are called intra dermal allergy tests, which is just a little injection of the allergenic material under the skin which isn’t necessarily needed in all cases but most patients do get the prick test and then a fair number also will get the intra dermal.

You can do blood allergy testing which is usually equally good at picking up allergy but we usually prefer the skin testing just because you get the results right away that day so patients usually prefer that and you also don’t have to go through the process of a blood draw. The tests are pretty reliable, I mean we think that really if you have allergies probably an eighty to ninety percent of cases, those tests will pick it up. So the most common allergens that we test for, part of our routine screening test for allergies, would be the pollen, so tree, grass, and weed pollen. We test for mold, both indoor and outdoor, dogs, cats, dust mites and cockroaches are part of kind of our screening panel and then if there’s other specific things that the patient might be concerned about we can always add those on.

Researchers at the University of Cambridge say they’ve discovered the exact cause of cat allergies. The study’s lead researcher pointed out, “How cat dander causes such a severe allergic reaction in some people has long been a mystery. Allergic reactions usually come when a person’s immune system responds negatively to a foreign substance, like a virus or bacteria. But typically-harmless substances can trigger the same reaction. Including a protein found in feline saliva. When cats lick themselves clean, that protein gets passed on to people through their dandruff. And when it comes in contact with a bacterial toxin called LPS, it triggers a negative response from the immune system. But after using a test drug that blocks that allergen, the researchers found the proteins didn’t affect humans cells.

Cats are fluffy, furry, cuddly, and the leading cause of pet allergies in the U.S. You can be exposed to cat allergens like dander and saliva without even knowing it – like on the clothes of family and friends who own cats or from a stray roaming your yard. If you have cat allergies, the best way to help prevent symptoms is by avoiding cats. But if you visit a home with cats, take allergy medicine with you. During your visit, ask that the cat be kept away from you and when you get home, change and wash your clothes. If you have a cat, reduce your exposure at home by declaring bedrooms, furniture, and counters “pet-free” zones.  Also ask someone else to clean the litter box. All cats produce dander, so there is no such thing as a naturally hypoallergenic cat. If you have cat allergies, a pet without fur or feathers might be a better option. But before adopting any pet, consider a trial run to see how you react.

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